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Providing perinatal support and education for Massachusetts families of multiples.

© 2015-17 by Three Birds Family Education & Postpartum Care

Serving the Boston and Worcester metro areas including: Cambridge | Somerville | Arlington | Belmont | Lexington | Concord | Brookline 

 Newton | Wellesley | Weston | Natick | Hudson | Marlborough | Northborough | Westborough | Shrewsbury and surrounding areas.

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The Parent Tracker

January 23, 2017

Our last blog talked about the importance of tracking your newborns’ daily life and different systems that are available. An infant log is a pretty common tool, and while it’s obviously important to take care of your newborns, it’s also important to take care of yourself. In the midst of caring for two, three, or more bundles of joy, it can hard to remember to take care of yourself.  It's too easy to get caught up in the eat/sleep/poop cycle of keeping multiple tiny humans alive and I wanted to find a way to remind new parents that they needed to eat/sleep/go to the bathroom occasionally. With that goal in mind, I developed a Parent's Postpartum Log as a companion to an infant tracker.

 

There is no right way to use a postpartum log. It can be used as a to do list: "these are the meds that I need to take today, I'm also scheduling 20 minutes to myself to read a book, and I'm going to make sure I eat those delicious cookies my doula brought the last time she was here." Your log can function more as a diary: "today was ok, rough start but I felt much better after we all got out for a walk." It can also be a helpful tool, allowing you to compare your day to the babies: "everyone was super fussy after I had pasta with garlic and broccoli for dinner- maybe go lighter on the gassy veggies next time."

 

Keeping track of your daily thoughts and moods can also help you recognize when something may not be right and allow you get to help sooner.  Parents of multiples have a higher occurrence of postpartum mood disorders - postpartum depression, postpartum anxiety, postpartum OCD, and related illnesses. Staying aware and proactive, and making sure your support system is aware and proactive, can ensure that you get the help you need if the situation ever arises.

 

And at the end of the day, just the simple act of writing down a few adult-specific notes can help give you a moment to reflect on what an amazing job you're doing. 

 

Download a copy of the Three Birds Postpartum Log.

 

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